Our tales on rocks in Ellora Caves: the Buddhist, Hindu and Jain art of Medieval India (Paperback)

Our tales on rocks in Ellora Caves: the Buddhist, Hindu and Jain art of Medieval India By Prakash Thorat Cover Image

Our tales on rocks in Ellora Caves: the Buddhist, Hindu and Jain art of Medieval India (Paperback)

$40.00


Not On Our Shelves—Ships in 1-5 Days
(This book cannot be returned.)
The Cave Temples of Ellora, 30 KMS, from Aurangabad district of Maharashtra state, India, is a heritage site for the World and a priced jewel of Indian Civilization, as at Ellora, one witnesses the harmonious co-existence of three major religions of the modern secular India, the Hinduism, the Buddhism and the Jainism. Like Ajanta Caves, Ellora was never discovered. It was always open for visit throughout the ancient and medieval ages. Even though the architectural activities here began in 5th Century A.D., it was only with the rise of the Chalukya-Rashtrakuta rulers in 7th Century to 10th Century A.D. that art and architecture blossomed at Ellora. The Hindu Rulers in ancient times were governed by certain religious injunctions and ethical codes which promoted them to donate the funds to the temple building as the same was considered essential for attainment of worldly power and spiritual salvation. The artists at Ellora were quick to respond to the urges and demands of their society. They rose to height of their creative dynamism. They acted out of passion and feelings, faith and sensibility. They drew themes from the mythology and then transformed the rock into a cavalcade of Gods and Goddesses. While doing so, they judiciously portrayed the feelings of compassion, emotions and the fury. The temple of Kailasa is an illustration of one of those rare occasions when men's mind, heart and hand, worked in unison to build this feat. The rocks cut monuments at Ellora, essentially represent the climax of the process of cutting shrine in direct rock and fashion them into the places of worship and residence embellished with beautiful and imposing sculptural and pictorial images. This practice started by Buddhism thousands of years ago, was eventually adopted by Hinduism and Jainism.The monuments 34 caves] are numbered in a continuous sequence. Buddhist monuments (Caves 1-12) occupy the southernmost part of the site, while Hindu monuments (Caves 13-29) are located in the middle and towards the north are a small number of five Jain excavations (Caves 30-34]. The infinite lithic representations at Ellora coordinate into the greatest concentration of the sculpture, wrought at a single site, in diverse styles that art history has ever witnessed. All the aspects related to daily life, Gods and goddesses, myths and rituals related to all the three dominant religions, are exhibited in Ellora through architecture and sculptures. In most of the caves, however, the focal points are centered round the figures of divinities - Buddha, Shiva and Jain Thirthankaras. Music, dancing and erotic plays of all the carved and painted creatures turn to the central figures of divinity. Gods and demi-gods, flying nymphs, musicians, kinnaras, dwarfs, makara, elephants, bulls, lion, peacocks or aquatic creatures- whether they are in the main hall, on the roofs and walls, in the side chambers, in porches, in balconies, in galleries, whether they are standing or flying, the entire attention of visitors and devotees is attracted to them and the divinities they surround by- Buddha, Shiva or Tirthankaras.
Product Details ISBN: 9798582389033
Publisher: Independently Published
Publication Date: December 22nd, 2020
Pages: 190
Language: English